Lillian M. Davault

F, b. 28 June 1884, d. 12 January 1965
     Lillian M. Davault was born on 28 June 1884 at Phelps Co. (probably), MO. She was the daughter of Roland Davault and Josephine Shuey. Lillian M. Davault married Thomas Rayford Drennen, son of George Plummer Drennen and Katherine Kevern, on 5 September 1906 at St. James, Phelps Co., MO. Lillian M. Davault died on 12 January 1965 at St. James, Phelps Co., MO, at age 80. She was buried in January 1965 at Saint James Cemetery, St. James, Phelps Co., MO, Findagrave #87775919.

Children of Lillian M. Davault and Thomas Rayford Drennen

Lillian Mae DaVault

F, b. 10 June 1887, d. February 1975
     Lillian Mae DaVault was born on 10 June 1887. She was the daughter of Alfred DaVault and Elizabeth Gardner. Occupation: Assistant postmaster at New Florence. Lillian Mae DaVault lived at Mexico, Audrain Co., MO. She died in February 1975 at Mexico, Audrain Co., MO, at age 87.

Louisa DaVault

F, b. 12 April 1827, d. 26 December 1886
     Note: Louise Davault was the tenth child of Frederick and Margaret Davault. She was born in 1827 at the Tavern in Leesburg, Tennessee. In November of 1847, a few months after the death of her father, Louise married Robert Rankin. He later became a Colonel. Louisa DaVault was born on 12 April 1827 at DeVault Tavern, Leesburg, Washington Co., TN. She was the daughter of Frederick DaVault and Margaret Range. Louisa DaVault married Col. Robert L. S. Rankin, son of David Rankin and Jane Bell Dinwiddie, on 9 November 1847 at Washington Co., TN. Louisa DaVault married Charles Gray Rankin, son of John Rankin and Louisa A. Gray, on 17 December 1857 at Washington Co., TN. Louisa DaVault died on 26 December 1886 at Greene Co., TN, at age 59. She was buried in December 1886 at Mt. Bethel Presbyterian Church, near Limestone, Washington Co., Greene Co., TN.

Children of Louisa DaVault and Col. Robert L. S. Rankin

Children of Louisa DaVault and Charles Gray Rankin

Lucinda Davault

F, b. April 1843
     Note: per Tracy Devault:

Dorothy (DeVault) Bicknell has a note in her genealogy of Henry Dewald of Pennsylvania to the effect that Emma (Childress) DeVault was a granddaughter of Henry and Kitty DeVault. If Dorothy is talking about Henry and Kitty (Gross) Dawalt, I can find no evidence to substantiate this claim. Emma was the daughter of William and Lucinda (Davault) Childress. There is an article (Families and History of Sullivan County Tennessee, Volume I, 1779 - 1992, Article 759 - Elijah E. Davault) that states that the Lucinda Davault (later DeVault) that married William Childress is the grandaughter of Daniel Davault and Mary Ann Roller. This means that she is not a descendant of our Henry Dewald of Pennsylvania. William and Lucinda (DeVault) Childress are buried in the Paperville Cemetery next to Henry DeVault Childress and his wife. Henry and Emma were brother and sister.

Lucinda Davault was born in April 1843 at Tennessee.1,2 She married William Henry Childress circa 1865.2

Child of Lucinda Davault and William Henry Childress

Citations

  1. [S1256] 1880 Federal Census, Sullivan County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T9, Roll 1281; FHL #1255281.
  2. [S1872] 1900 Federal Census, Sullivan County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T623, Roll 1601; FHL #1241601.

Margaret M. DaVault

F, b. 8 March 1878, d. 30 August 1885
     Margaret M. DaVault was born on 8 March 1878 at Gasconade Co., MO. She was the daughter of Valentine Franklin DaVault and Lucinda Adella Fallis. Margaret M. DaVault died on 30 August 1885 at age 7. She was buried in September 1885 at Scantlin Cemetery, Pehlps Co., MO, Findagrave #86300957.

Marguerite Medora Davault1

F, b. 24 August 1914, d. 2 March 2001
     Marguerite Medora Davault was born on 24 August 1914 at Pratt, Pratt Co., KS, SS Applications and Claims Index (ancestry.com.)1 She was the daughter of Frederick Adolph Davault and Alma Sue Dyerly.1 Marguerite Medora Davault married Gilbert Evermont Talbot, son of Gilbert L. Talbot and Georgia F. Ward, circa 1934, This marriage apparently ended about 1940. In October, 1940 Gilbert was living in Hood County, Oregon and listed his father as his next of kin on his WW II draft registration. According to the Social Security Applications and Claims Index, by August, 1944 Marguerite was remarried to a Chambers. Marguerite Chambers is listed in several San Antonio, Texas, city directories during the late 1940s and early 1950s, where she worked as a clerk for a Chevrolet automobile dealer. The name of her Chambers husband was not found. Marguerite later married Roland W. "Rollie" Funk (1913 - 2000) on 14 OCT 1987 at Carson City, Nevada.

Marguerite Medora Davault lived on 10 April 1940 at Hutchinson, Reno Co., KS.2 She lived in 1948 at 2324 Pleasanton Road, San Antonio, Bexar Co., TX, city directory listing. She died on 2 March 2001 at DeKalb Co., GA, at age 86 per SSDI, last residence Stone Mountain (her daughter's home)

Death Notice -- Pratt Tribune, The (KS); March 2, 2001:

Marguerite M. (Davault) Funk
STONE MOUNTAIN, Ga. -- Marguerite M. (Davault) Funk, 86, formerly of Pratt, died March 1. Services are pending with Larrison Mortuary.

She was buried in March 2001 at Greenlawn Cemetery, Pratt, Pratt Co., KS, Findagrave #130990805.

Citations

  1. [S2051] 1920 Federal Census, Pratt County, Kansas. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T625, Roll 545.
  2. [S3518] 1940 Federal Census, Reno County, Kansas. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T627, Roll 1253.

Martha Catherine Davault1

F, b. 24 August 1834, d. 6 August 1918
     Martha Catherine Davault was born on 24 August 1834 at Bluff City, Sullivan Co., TN.1 She was the daughter of Henry Davault and Matilda Weaver.1 Martha Catherine Davault married William Anderson Cross, son of Jesse Cross and Susannah Hicks, on 9 November 1854 at Sullivan Co., TN. Martha Catherine Davault died on 6 August 1918 at age 83. She was buried in August 1918 at Cross Cemetery, Piney Flats, Sullivan Co., TN.

Citations

  1. [S1277] 1850 Federal Census, Sullivan County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M432, Roll 897.

Martha Ellen Davault

F, b. 30 October 1901, d. 27 February 1997
     Martha Ellen Davault was born on 30 October 1901 at Mineola, Montgomery Co., MO.1 She was the daughter of William Frederick Davault and Catherine Beal Benson. Occupation: Public School Teacher between 1920 and 1930. Martha Ellen Davault was educated; Attended the University of Missouri. She married Hugh Robert Crabtree, son of Walter R. Crabtree and Mary Adele Wells, on 29 June 1931 at Tremonton, Cache Co., UT. Martha Ellen Davault died on 27 February 1997 at Aberdeen, Grays Harbor Co., WA, at age 95. She was buried on 4 March 1997 at Riverside Cemetery, Emmett, Gem Co., ID.
Note:


When Martha was about four years old she was hoeing with a toy hoe one evening and flipped a grass stem or small stick into her eye near the pupil. Her parents drove her 15 miles to the doctor in Montgomery City in a buggy. Not really wanting a drink, but frightened and used to stopping at Rock Well for picnics when traveling, she demanded a drink from Rock Well. Rather than cause her to cry, her father stopped in the dark to get her a drink from the spring. The Montgomery doctor arranged for the train to make an unscheduled stop at Montgomery City and he and Martha's mother took Martha to a specialist in St. Louis to remove the stick. This whole business took all night. In the morning Martha and her mother went to Cousin Bell Benson's house and the doctor to friends or relatives in the same general area of St. Louis to rest until catching the afternoon train back to Montgomery City where Martha's father met them with the buggy.

When Martha was about six years old she got a bean stuck up her nose and was again taken to the doctor. The bean came out before the trip was completed though Martha never told anyone because she wanted to see a friend.

The Benson family had been fond of good horses and Martha's mother, Katie (Benson) Davault, had
inherited at least one and possibly more horses from her parents or acquired them when she and her husband purchased the Benson homestead. Martha's horse, Beauty, was the half-Tennessee-Walker offspring of Topsy, one of the Benson's high-schooled horses. Her family used Topsy to pull the buggy because she was a bit rough riding. Martha claimed that the high stepping showy Tennessee Walkers of today's show ring have been developed in modern times. The Tennessee Walkers of her day had the smooth distance-eating gaits for the traveler, but held their heads low, the neck level with the back. While she admired show horses and loved to attend horse shows, she always said that to her Beauty was beautiful. She had many stories to tell involving Beauty. One day Martha was visited by a young man who came calling to impress her with his new horse. Martha was peeved at him for she knew he had called upon another girl on a farm in the vicinity and finding she was not at home made the Davault home his next stop. With showing off as his goal, he suggested they go riding. Beauty's gaits were faultless, nor could she be out-distanced. Martha was enjoying the comparison and by now she was gloating! Frustrated, the young man turned his horse toward a fence and sailed over. At this point, Martha became a little concerned for she had never taken Beauty over a high fence; however she decided that Beauty was smart enough to simply refuse to jump if the fence were too high. Besides, this was a good opportunity to put that fellow in his place! Pretending this was something she did every day and hiding her worry, Martha turned Beauty towards the high fence and sailed over with no hesitation and room to spare. A very cocky young man was thoroughly out-shown and Martha said she wasn't the least bit sorry he never came calling again.
After high school, Martha taught at one-room country schools, living at home and riding Beauty to school each day. At one school, not a great distance from her home, but in a direction she did not regularly travel and therefore did not know the locals, she was warned by the head of the school board of several older boys with the reputation of running off previous teachers with their loutish, bullying ways. This gentleman insisted on going to school with Martha the first day so he could introduce her and lecture the troublesome boys. Martha decided the best thing she could do was to start out as she intended to carry on. When the class was assembled and before the head of the school board could open his mouth, she sized up the potential troublemakers, chose the largest and most swaggering boy; easily a head taller than herself and one she had heard came from a family with livestock and said, "You look like you might know about animals." When the startled boy replied of course he did, he knew all about taking care of animals, Martha told him she was very particular about Beauty but perhaps if he felt he could handle the job he could take care of her horse each day. Not one day of trouble did she have out of the so-called troublemakers. Martha went to school in Fulton, Missouri as did her sister. Jackson Benson, Martha's uncle, was said to have hidden a large sum of money somewhere on the old Eden Benson homestead and died without revealing its whereabouts. It was thought by some that the slave, Cicero, may have known where the money was hidden and used the knowledge to better his own position, for he somehow came to have his own cabin after the Emancipation Proclamation. The theories abounded and there were times when family members would return home to find evidence of persons having searched the property. Interest in finding the money carried over to 1920 when Martha's father tore the old house down. The day he tore down the chimneys, a crowd of neighbors gathered to watch, curious as to whether the treasure would be found hidden behind the stones. Even Martha conducted searches when she was quite young. After her father diverted the runoff from the hillside, Martha would ride her horse along the original drainage ravine looking for eroded places along the banks that might expose a treasure box. One time she even pulled the plaster from the wall in her bedroom when she imagined the crack under the window might be widened to allow access to a hiding place. It was empty.
Stories provided by her daughter, Catherine Adele (Crabtree) Cook, 1974.

Citations

  1. [S5250] 1910 Federal Census, Callaway County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T624, Roll 774; FHL #1374787.

Martha Frances Davault1

F, b. 26 February 1870, d. 26 May 1900
     Martha Frances Davault was also known as "Frances".1 Martha Frances Davault was also known as "Mattie".2 She was born on 26 February 1870 at Maries Co., MO.2 She was the daughter of John Davault and Matilda Jane Bowen. Martha Frances Davault lived in 1889 at St. James, Phelps Co., MO. She married William James Gorman, son of Matthew Gorman and Mary Elizabeth Connell, on 27 November 1889 at St. James, Phelps Co., MO. Martha Frances Davault died on 26 May 1900 at Phelps Co. (probably), MO, at age 30

Obituary -- (Findagrave.com):

Saint James Leader-Journal, June 1, 1900

Mrs. Fanny Devault Gorman, after a most painfull and distressing illness of ten months, peacefully passed away on Saturday, May 26, 1900.

She was born in Maries county on the 26th day of February, 1870, and was married to William J. Gorman, at the bride's home, in the presence of near relatives on Nov. 27, 1889.
Although everything possible known to the medical preofession was ministered and human sympathy had spent itself in vain, the physicians were forced to the the awful verdict that she must die. Long and trying had been her sickness, and a change for the better would inspire hope in the hearts of anxious watchers, until finally the summons came and her voice was stilled in death.

The funeral services were conducted from the Methodist church by Rev. John C. Sanue.

She had been a consecrated member of the Baptist church for several years, and during her illness would calmly talk to her heavenly home beyond the shores of this life. Relatives and anxiious friends were about her bedside, and to them she had a parting word. Calm as in the midst of vigorous life, she spoke of her departure to a beautiful land beyond the sun, and it was a well known fact by all who were present that this was a happy death-bed scene. She leaves a devoted father and mother, a loving husband, one brother and two sons and one daughter aged respectively 8, 6 and 2 years to mourn her demise.

Sorrowing friends joined the cortege in its march to the grave in the Masonic cemetery, and there, beneath the sod on which were placed sweet flowers, the tribute of sad hearts, we left her knowing that in heaven there is rest for her. A. FRIEND.

She was buried in May 1900 at Saint James Cemetery, Saint James, Phelps Co., MO, Findagrave #86139982.

Children of Martha Frances Davault and William James Gorman

Citations

  1. [S5169] 1880 Federal Census, Phelps County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T9, Roll 709; FHL #1254709.
  2. [S1283] 1870 Federal Census, Maries County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M593, Roll 791; FHL #552290.
  3. [S1278] 1900 Federal Census, Phelps County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T623, Rolls 880 - 881; FHL #1240880 - 81.

Mary Davault

F, b. 27 July 1846, d. 11 October 1860
     Mary Davault was born on 27 July 1846 at Washington Co., TN.1 She was the daughter of Samuel Davault and Salina Galloway. Mary Davault died on 11 October 1860 at Macoupin Co., IL, at age 14. She was buried in October 1860 at Range Cemetery, South Palmyra, Macoupin Co., IL.

Citations

  1. [S467] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M432, Roll 898.

Mary Ann DaVault

F, b. 1 January 1818, d. 18 September 1868
     Note: Mary Ann Davault was the third child of Frederick and Margaret Davault. She was born January 1, 1818, on the joint homestead of Frederick and Valentine Davault. On May 28, 1838 she married James W. Duncan. James was the son of Joseph Duncan who lived five miles from the tavern. Joseph was an elder in the Presbyterian Church at Leesburg. James spent most of his life in the mercantile business in Greene County, Tennessee. For a while he was in partnership with his brother Joseph Duncan, Jr. Joseph, Jr. had married Mary's sister, Elizabeth.

Russell (Frederick Russell) DeVault had this to say in regard to the Duncans: "Uncle Jim (James W.) was dressy and smart. Generally wore fine shirts, stand up collars and a high silk hat. I never knew a Duncan that was not a Presbyterian -- Scotch people -- Blue Stocking type."

In the settlement of her father's estate in 1850 there appears this notation: "Paid to James W. Duncan and wife and son, $656.01." Apparently Mary and James had a son, but no other information is known. Mary was living in Charlotte, North Carolina at the time of her death.

Mary Ann DaVault was born on 1 January 1818 at DeVault's Ford, Washington Co., TN. She was the daughter of Frederick DaVault and Margaret Range. Mary Ann DaVault married James Whitfield Duncan, son of Joseph Duncan and Molly Allison, on 24 May 1838 at Washington Co., TN. Mary Ann DaVault died on 18 September 1868 at Charlotte, Mecklenberg Co., NC, at age 50.

Mary Ann Davault1

F, b. circa 1846, d. 21 May 1873
     Mary Ann Davault was born circa 1846 at Bourbois Twp., Gasconade Co., MO.1 She was the daughter of Samuel Harvey Davault and Alvira Foley.1 Mary Ann Davault married William F. Scantlin, son of John B. Scantlin and Mahala (?), circa 1867.2 Mary Ann Davault died on 21 May 1873 at St. James Twp., Phelps Co., MO.

Children of Mary Ann Davault and William F. Scantlin

Citations

  1. [S1280] 1850 Federal Census, Gasconade County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M432, Roll 399.
  2. [S1281] 1870 Federal Census, Phelps County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M593, Roll 797; FHL #552296.
  3. [S1284] 1880 Federal Census, Gasconade County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T9, Roll 686; FHL #1254686.

Mary Elvira Davault

F, b. 27 September 1876, d. 7 October 1881
     Mary Elvira Davault was born on 27 September 1876. She was the daughter of Samuel Harvey Davault and Ruth Alice Blain. Mary Elvira Davault died on 7 October 1881 at age 5. She was buried in October 1881 at Scantlin Cemetery, Phelps Co., MO, Findagrave #86301218.

Mary Emma Davault

F, b. 15 November 1882, d. 22 November 1884
     Mary Emma Davault was born on 15 November 1882 at New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO. She was the daughter of Frederick Davault and Margaret Ellen McCleary. Mary Emma Davault died on 22 November 1884 at New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO, at age 2. Cause of death: on 22 November 1884 Diptheria. She was buried in November 1884 at New Florence Cemetery, New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO.

Mary Ida Davault1

F, b. circa 1873
     Mary Ida Davault was born circa 1873 at Maries Co., MO.1 She was the daughter of Jacob Davault and Sarah A. Moore.1

Citations

  1. [S5168] 1880 Federal Census, Maries County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T9, Roll 702; FHL #1254702.

Mary Magdalene Davault

F, b. 11 November 1841, d. 16 June 1843
     Mary Magdalene Davault was born on 11 November 1841 at Sullivan Co. (probably), TN. She was the daughter of Henry Davault and Matilda Weaver. Mary Magdalene Davault died on 16 June 1843 at age 1. She was buried in June 1843 at Cross Cemetery, Piney Flats, Sullivan Co., TN.

Mary Margaret DaVault

F, b. 21 November 1836, d. 26 April 1913
     Mary Margaret DaVault was born on 21 November 1836 at Danville, Montgomery Co., MO. She was the daughter of Henry DaVault and Mary Virginia Smith Maughs. Mary Margaret DaVault married Thomas Jefferson Powell, son of James Powell and Nancy Sheller, on 17 May 1853 at Montgomery Co., MO. Mary Margaret DaVault died on 26 April 1913 at Montgomery Co., MO, at age 76. She was buried in 1913 at New Florence Cemetery, New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO.

Children of Mary Margaret DaVault and Thomas Jefferson Powell

Mary Margrette Davault

F, b. 2 December 1876, d. 25 April 1953
     Mary Margrette Davault was also known as "Mollie".1 She was born on 2 December 1876 at Missouri Possibly born in Osage County, where her brother John was born.2 She was the daughter of Roland Davault and Josephine Shuey. Mary Margrette Davault married William James Gorman, son of Matthew Gorman and Mary Elizabeth Connell, on 24 December 1901 at Phelps Co., MO, Mary was a first cousin of William's first wife, Martha Frances Davault. William and Mary lost their first children, a set of twins born in the 1903 timeframe, buried in the St. James Cemetery. Mary Margrette Davault died on 25 April 1953 at age 76. She was buried in April 1953 at Saint James Cemetery, Saint James, Phelps Co., MO, Findagrave #86140206.
Note: Mary was a first cousin of William's first wife, Mattie Davault.

Children of Mary Margrette Davault and William James Gorman

Citations

  1. [S5170] 1910 Federal Census, Phelps County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T624, Roll 797; FHL #1374810.
  2. [S4039] 1880 Federal Census, Franklin County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T9, Roll 686; FHL #1254686.
  3. [S1156] 1920 Federal Census, Saint Louis Independent City. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T625, Rolls 947 - 961.

Mary Virginia DaVault

F, b. 11 December 1853, d. 7 March 1858
     Mary Virginia DaVault was born on 11 December 1853 at New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO. She was the daughter of Peter Davault and Mary Virginia Hoss. Mary Virginia DaVault died on 7 March 1858 at New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO, at age 4. She was buried in March 1858 at Section 1, Block 56, New Florence Cemetery, New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO.

Maude Davault1

F, b. August 1889
     Maude Davault was born in August 1889 at Gasconade or Phelps Co., MO.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Davault and Lucinda Isabelle Blain.1

Citations

  1. [S1278] 1900 Federal Census, Phelps County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T623, Rolls 880 - 881; FHL #1240880 - 81.

Michael Weaver Davault1

M, b. 28 January 1832, d. 12 March 1912
     Michael Weaver Davault was born on 28 January 1832 at Indiana.1,2 He was the son of Henry Davault and Matilda Weaver.1 Michael Weaver Davault married Catherine Webb, daughter of David Webb and Sarah Jones, before 1855. Michael Weaver Davault began military service Civil War, Confederate Army. He died on 12 March 1912 at Piney Flats, Sullivan Co., TN, at age 80. He was buried in March 1912 at Holston Grove Lutheran Church Cemetery, Sullivan Co., TN.

Children of Michael Weaver Davault and Catherine Webb

Citations

  1. [S1277] 1850 Federal Census, Sullivan County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M432, Roll 897.
  2. [S1711] 1860 Federal Census, Sullivan County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M653, Roll 1275; FHL #805275.
  3. [S2773] 1870 Federal Census, Sullivan County, Tennessee. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M593, Roll 1565; FHL #553064.

Mildred Marie Davault

F, b. 30 August 1919, d. 4 December 2007
     Mildred Marie Davault was born on 30 August 1919 at Mexico, Audrain Co., MO. She was the daughter of Bruce Thomas Davault and Gertrude Dunkin. Mildred Marie Davault married John Rogers Hendel, son of Charles A. Hendel and Helen Brelsford Higgins, on 7 December 1938 at Yuma, Yuma Co., AZ. Mildred Marie Davault lived at Cerritos, Los Angeles Co., CA. She died on 4 December 2007 at King Co., WA, at age 88.

Murl Davault

F, b. 1 March 1928, d. 5 March 1928
     Murl Davault was born on 1 March 1928; twin of Pearl. She was the daughter of William Jacob Davault and Blanche Isabell Hutchison. Murl Davault died on 5 March 1928. She was buried in March 1928 at Southard Cemetery, Maries Co., MO, Findagrave #63644071.

Opal Davault

F, b. circa 1907, d. 1995
     Opal Davault was born circa 1907 at Pratt Co. (probably), KS.1 She was the daughter of Frederick Adolph Davault and Alma Sue Dyerly.1 Opal Davault married Vernon L. Wilka. Opal Davault lived between 1953 and 1961 at 214 Soputh Gordon Avenue, Wichita, Sedgwick Co., KS. She died in 1995. She was buried in 1995 at Greenlawn Cemetery, Pratt, Pratt Co., KS, Findagrave #76144921.

Citations

  1. [S2045] 1910 Federal Census, Pratt County, Kansas. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T624, Roll 453; FHL #1374466.

Pearl Davault

F, b. 1 March 1928, d. 5 March 1928
     Pearl Davault was born on 1 March 1928; twin of Murl. She was the daughter of William Jacob Davault and Blanche Isabell Hutchison. Pearl Davault died on 5 March 1928. She was buried in March 1928 at Southard Cemetery, Maries Co., MO, Findagrave #63644139.

Peter Davault

M, b. 28 March 1808, d. 16 April 1872
     Peter Davault was born on 28 March 1808 at DeVault's Ford, Washington Co., TN. He was the son of Frederick DaVault and Margaret Range. Peter Davault married Mary Virginia Hoss, daughter of Abraham Hoss and Frances Boren, on 27 October 1831 at Washington Co., TN. Peter Davault died on 16 April 1872 at New Florence, Montgomery Co., MO, at age 64.
Note: Migrated with brother Henry to Montgomery County, MO after 1827. Returned to Tennessee to marry Mary Hoss, then went back to Missouri and built the DaVault Tavern, a double log house with a broad hallway as "protection against the red man and his strange associates already there". In 1849 the log house was replaced with a 2 1/2 story brick house, known as the Peter DaVault Homestead and occupied by descendants.

Peter Davault was the second child of Frederick and Margaret Davault. He was born on the joint homestead of Frederick and Valentine DeVault located at DeVault's Ford on the Watauga River. Peter was ten years old when his parents moved to the new community of Leesburg, Tennessee. Frederick constructed the DeVault Tavern at Leesburg and Peter lived there until he married Mary Hoss on October 27, 1831.

Shortly after his marriage, Peter, his wife, Mary and Peter's brother, Henry, left for Missouri. They traveled in two wagons drawn by oxen. Peter and Mary homesteaded a tract of land on the Boone Lick Road. It was located about a mile from the future town on New Florence. Their first home was a log structure of two rooms separated by a covered entrance. The house was said to provide protection from "the red man and his strange associates, already there." Like his father, Peter, began to cater to travelers along the road, providing a place to rest and obtain refreshments. Like his father's place, this place soon became known as the "Davault Tavern." It is interesting to note that the trail laid out by Daniel Boone, the Boone Lick Road, passed in front of Frederick's tavern in Tennessee and also in front of Peter's tavern in Missouri.

In the census of 1850, Peter's land was valued at $9,000.00. By 1860 the valuation had increased to $39,000.00 -- the largest of any of the grandsons of Henry DeWald of York Co., Pennsylvania. For his time Peter was a very wealthy man.

When Peter died, he left no will. His son, Fred, administered the estate and signed an affidavit on October 8, 1907, 35 years after Peter's death. (On April 12, 1901, the original records were destroyed by fire.)

Peter and his wife were both buried in the Davault Family Plot across the road from their house. When Virginia Davault (Peter's brother Henry's widow) died on October 7, 1895, she was buried in the New Florence Cemetery. Twenty-three days later, Fred and Alf Davault removed the body of their uncle, Henry, and placed it beside that of his wife. They also transferred the bodies of Henry and Virginia's two sons, Elijah and John, the body of their Aunt Catherine, who died in 1850, and the bodies of Peter and Mary Davault.

The Peter Davault Homestead is located on the Old Boone Lick Road, one mile south of the present site of New Florence. It is also 4 1/2 miles east of Danville and is along the line of the state highway. The place passed into the possession of descendents of his daughter, Catherine, who married David Knox. By 1968 the old building had been destroyed to make room for a freeway.


Newspaper Articles published at the time a historical marker was placed at the site of the Davault Tavern:

DAVAULT TAVERN

In the spring of 1828, following the path of Daniel Boone, as laid out in 1815, came Peter Davault with his wife, Mary Hoss and took permanent abode upon the tract of land where John U. Knox now resides -- the passing of Pioneers over the old Trail being traveled to-day, had been common for some years, but with that nomadic idea of something better farther on, so when Mr. and Mrs. Davault arrived, vast prairies laid to the north, deep woodlands to the south, with not a neighbor within ten miles.

Peter Davault, the pioneer, was a son of Frederick Davault, of Jonesboro, Tennessee. He a son of Henry Davault, born in France, coming to America in 1764, landing near Philadelphia, but soon taking up his abode in Hanover County, Pennsylvania, where he passed the period of the Revolutionary War. Henry Davault died at the age 85 years.

Leaving Jonesboro, Tenn. Peter Davault and wife, then but a short time married pressed their way by ox teams to this place. A double log house with a broad hallway between was soon erected and protection given against the red man and his strange associates already here. This at once became the Davault Tavern and the Pilgrimager plodding his way westward was given rest and refreshment. The Tavern became the stopping place of tradesmen, as many as 20 men with teams were cared for at a time. Prices were not as to-day a single meal was 15c, Supper, lodging and breakfast with team cared for, was only 50 cents. Great droves of cattle, hogs and turkeys rested here over night. Slaves cared for the dining room while "uncle Sam" whose body lies in the graveyard just to the northward, watched the turkeys until they found a roost in the trees or upon the fences.

In 1849 as caravan after caravan passed by, enroute to the gold fields of California, the double log house gave away to a large brick house 2 1/2 story high. The brick for this building were burned just across the road to the east. The present foundation as seen was a part of the brick building. The present frame building took the place of the brick in 1865.

(Note: According to Eugenia Davault, the bricks were defective and part or all of the structure was replaced; many of the old bricks being used inside the walls of the wooden structure.)

To Mr. and Mrs. Davault were born nine children, Henry, Abraham, Frederick, Alf, John, Kittie, Lou, Emma and Mary. Mr. Davault lived until 1872 and Mrs. Davault until 1882. Four children yet live, John, Fred, Alf and Lou, the latter two rejoiced in being present at the dedication.

As the Davault Tavern marker shall stand as a memorial to the Pioneer who braved dangers and hardships that civilization might penetrate westward, may it also stand as an incentive to progress, peace and happiness for the many millions yet to pass over the great National Old Trail.

MARKERS DEDICATED

In Spite Of Rain, Mud and Cold The D. A. R's Carry Out Program.

All honor in the pluck and grit of the D. A. R's. When Gov. Majors appointed Mrs. Mark S. Salisbury of Kansas City, Mrs. Geo. B. McFarlane of Columbia, State Regent and Mrs John VanBrunt of Kansas City to have charge of the markers on the Old Trail, he evidently knew his ladies. This was the week of dedication, starting in at St. Louis all went well until Foristell was reached. By fighting mud, bad roads and etc., Warrenton was reached. The Wabash was used to Jonesburg were Wednesday, just after lunch the Cross Keys tavern marker was dedicated, and the one at Lewiston as well, with the same ceremonies. The school children sang "America", presentation speeches were made by Mrs. Salisbury and Deputy State Highway Engineer Hawkins, acceptances by Mrs. Wardie Ebert Regent of the local chapter and Dr. J. L. Jones.

Undaunted, the ladies braved the heavy rains, and muddy roads, however abandoning the automoile and taking to hack, just as Pioneers did of old, they drove to the Davault Tavern, which was reached at 4 o'clock.

The marker for this point was in the car at noon yet when the ladies arrived it was duly in place. A program of special interest had been arranged but was canceled on account of the rain. Upon their arrival Mr. and Mrs. John Knox entertained for a few moments after which Mrs. Van Brunt representing the state D. A. R's in a flow of language, eloquent and full of inspiration presented the marker. This was approved by State Commissioner Hawkins. Mr. Alf Davault who was born and reared at the old place in a few words received the marker. Mrs. Chas. A. Bast of Mexico presented a sketch of the tavern. The ladies drove to Montgomery City and were entertained in the evening by Montgomery Chapter.

Thursday morning Danville and Mineola markers were formally dedicated and the trip continued on to Fulton.

At Mineola Mrs. Emma Graham made the acceptance for the D.A.R's and Mr. Ben Graham for the County.

Letter from Peter Davault to his brother John dated May 30, 1840:

Mr. John Davault
Leesburg, Washington Co
Tennessee May 30, 1840

Dear Brother:
I now take my pen in hand to inform you that we are all enjoying health at present. Henry and his family also the same blessing. I received your letter dated April 10 which gave me great satisfaction to hear from you and that all are well and doing well, particular Father and Mother, for I long to hear from them at times, we get letters seldom.

I believe with you, the way they have been slipping off from them is a caution, but I am afraid that the place has become so slippery, that there will be more slipping done yet before very long and leave the old folks by themselves. Tell David I have first honored father with his name. I have a boy a year old before yesterday, which I call Frederick and define any one to show a pertine boy than he is. He has been walking for some time and can begin to talk. Little Henry is going to school in Danville and can read quite well and commencing to
write and will soon write you a letter. Tell Mr Duncan he must not think hard of me for not writting him before. He wrote a very fine letter, but most too mysterious on politicks for me to comprecate; tell him he must not decline writting to me for I shall write him an answer yet soon some time when I have a leisure moment or too.

I have nothing of importance to write you at this time. The politicks of this state is card to a great extent; there was in St Louis the largest meeting that has ever been seen in the west, there was thought to have been 3.000 people, besides the city, pulling canoes and log cabins and buildings of dimentions made of logs and sticks; even went so far as having wagon beds full of clay and men on them digging graves; and coffins setting on them as they went along. I have to send a letter tonight, and it is getting late. I will stop for the present, I intend to have said more.

Your affectionate brother,
Peter Davault

Note: This letter was sent before the time of stamps. The envelope was a plain sheet of paper, folded and the back sealed with sealing wax. The letter had been placed and remained for almost 100 years in a wooden mail pouch where it hung in the DeVault Tavern, Leesburg, Tennessee. In 1946, the letter was given to Newland DeVault by John's son, Russell DeVault. Today (2004) the letter is in the possession of Newland's daughter, Jean (DeVault) Switzer. In 1999 I was told by Mary (DeVault) Butcher, present owner of the Davault Tavern (Tennessee), that the mail pouch had been stolen some years ago.

Note: Fourteen months after receiving this letter, John Davault, of Leesburg, made a trip to Missouri on horseback to see his brothers Peter and Henry and his sister Catherine (Davault) Crawford. When he arrived at Peter's home, neither Peter nor his wife Mary knew him and they would not believe it was he until John showed them his name in his hat band. John had been 12 years old when Peter left Tennessee, he was now 22. John stayed 58 days. He left Missouri on November 16, arriving back at Leesburg, Tennessee on December 11, 1841. He spent 19 days traveling to Missouri and 25 days on the return trip.

Children of Peter Davault and Mary Virginia Hoss

Rainey Forrest Davault1

M, b. 7 January 1891, d. 21 September 1958
     Rainey Forrest Davault was born on 7 January 1891 at Broadway, Maries Co., MO.1 He was the son of William Robert Davault and Martha Victoria Cox.1 Rainey Forrest Davault married Iva Louvonie Gray, daughter of James Martin Gray and Mary Jane Hays, on 28 August 1913 at Phelps Co., MO. Rainey Forrest Davault lived in April 1930 at Bourbois Twp., Gasconade Co., MO, truck driver.2 He died on 21 September 1958 at Roark Twp., Gasconade Co., MO, at age 67. He was buried on 26 September 1958 at Southard Cemetery, Maries Co., MO, Findagrave #63643422.

Children of Rainey Forrest Davault and Iva Louvonie Gray

Citations

  1. [S5164] 1900 Federal Census, Maries County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T623, Roll 874; FHL #1240874.
  2. [S5205] 1930 Federal Census, Gasconade County, Missouri. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T626, Roll 1187; FHL #2340922.

Raymond Wilson Davault

M, b. 4 January 1919, d. 31 August 2000
     Raymond Wilson Davault was born on 4 January 1919 at Vichy, Maries Co., MO. He was the son of William Jacob Davault and Blanche Isabell Hutchison. Raymond Wilson Davault married Iva Grace Cramer on 29 July 1942 at Cuba, Crawford Co., MO. Raymond Wilson Davault began military service WW II service, U.S. Army, Cpl. He died on 31 August 2000 at St. Louis, MO, at age 81

Obituary -- Steelville Star-Crawford Mirror, Steelville, Crawford County, Missouri, week of September 14, 2000:

Raymond W. Davault
Raymond W. Davault of Cuba, Mo. was born on January 4, 1919 at Vichy, Mo. to the union of William Jacob Davault and Blanche Davault nee Hutchison and passed away on August 31, 2000 at the Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. at the age of 81 years, 7 months and 27 days.

On July 29, 1942 he was united in marriage to Iva Grace Cramer at Cuba, Mo. They were happily married until she preceded him in death on April 22, 1980.

On January 8, 1989 he was united in marriage to Helen Hoffman Beauchamp at Cuba, Mo. They were happily married until she preceded him in death on February 24, 1993.

On September 29, 1941 Raymond entered the Army of the United States of America, served in World War II and was honorably discharged on December 5, 1945.

Raymond was an active member of the Cuba First Baptist Church of Cuba, Mo. He was a member of the Delhi Baptist Church from 1988 to 1998.

Those who survive to morn his passing from this life are his two brothers William R. Davault and Kenneth Davault and wife Sylvia; two nephews Roger Davault and wife Judy and Aubrey Davault and wife Trisha; one niece Rhonda Davault; great nieces and nephews; other relatives and many friends.

Raymond was a devoted husband, loving brother, uncle, good friend to all who knew him and will be sadly missed.
Raymond W. Davault was in state at the Britton Funeral Home of Cuba, Mo. Funeral services were held on Saturday, September 2, 2000 at 11:00 a.m. at the Cuba First Baptist Church, Cuba, Mo. with Rev. Bob Houchins and Rev. Charles Ledbetter officiating. Interment was in the Meramec Hills Cemetery, Cuba, Mo. All arrangements were under the direction of the Funeral Home of Cuba, Mo.

He was buried in September 2000 at Meramec Hills Memorial Lawn, Cuba, Crawford Co., MO, Findagrave #102480645.

Regina May Davault

F, b. 8 April 1903, d. 18 April 1991
     Regina May Davault was born on 8 April 1903 at Farber, Audrain Co., MO. She was the daughter of Emmett Creigh Davault and Rebecca Sturgis. Regina May Davault married Raymond Franklin Boothe, son of (?) Boothe and (?) Wilson, on 3 July 1932. Regina May Davault lived at a ranch near Fernley, Lyon Co., NV. She died on 18 April 1991 at age 88.

Robert Emmett Davault

M, b. 30 May 1900, d. 2 July 1992
     Robert Emmett Davault was born on 30 May 1900 at St. Charles Co., MO. He was the son of Emmett Creigh Davault and Rebecca Sturgis. Robert Emmett Davault was educated; Attended school in Tulsa and the University of Oklahoma. He married Orpha Lucille Metsker on 18 January 1935 at Las Vegas, Clark Co., NV. Robert Emmett Davault married Genevieve Ruth Campbell, daughter of (?) Campbell and (?) Pinell, on 28 September 1957 at Las Vegas, Clark Co., NV. Occupation: Retired from Standard Oil of California; teaches flying and does some commercial flying. Robert Emmett Davault died on 2 July 1992 at Jupiter, Palm Beach Co., FL, at age 92. He was buried in July 1992, Cremated, ashes scattered over Avanal Airport, Kings Co., California.